Human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) 150 words minimum peer response | nursing | American Association of Colleges of Nursing

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Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a part of the Lentivirus within the Retroviriade family and subfamily Orthoretrovirinae. It is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system. It can be contracted by sexual contact, sharing needles, and mother to baby. Symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus can manipulate flu-like symptoms. For example, fever, chills, muscle aches, swollen lymph nodes, fatigue, etc. Symptoms can last for several days up to several weeks. While some may have symptoms, others do not feel sick after contracting human immunodeficiency virus. It is important to seek medical attention it can cause death. There are three stages of the virus: acute human immunodeficiency virus, chronic human immunodeficiency virus, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. During the first phase, the acute human immunodeficiency virus, large amounts of the virus are found in the bloodstream, and they are contagious. Some people may or may not have symptoms right away. Phase two, chronic human immunodeficiency virus, the virus produces slower than phase one. Someone that has not sought treatment can transmit during this phase. Phase three, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is the most severe phase of the virus. People in this stage are diagnosed with their count levels of CD4 drop below 200 cell/mm. Someone with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be very infectious. One someone contracts human immunodeficiency virus, they have it for life. There is no effective cure. Though, the virus can be controlled through an effective human immunodeficiency virus treatment. Someone that gets the treatment can live healthy, long lives, and can protect their partners. Some typical preventions for human immunodeficiency virus are effectively use condoms every time during anal or vaginal sex. In addition, do not inject drugs or do not share injection equipment. Over the centuries human immunodeficiency virus has become a developed virus with science always developing. Human immunodeficiency viruses are continuously checked to enable the detection of emerging new variants. 

Reference:  

Gürtler, D. L., & Aepfelbacher, D. M. (2016, May). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Transfusion medicine and hemotherapy: offizielles Organ der Deutschen Gesellschaft fur Transfusionsmedizin und Immunhamatologie. Retrieved May 24, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924471/ 

N.A. (2021, June 1). About HIV/AIDS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved May 24, 2022, from https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/whatishiv.html#:~:text=HIV%20(human%20immunodeficiency%20virus)%20is,healthy%20and%20prevent%20HIV%20transmission